American Impressionism

Spring Time for American Women Impressionists

The sketchiness of an impressionist painting is often tied to the airiness of the season, the time of day, and the location of the view. Spring time, which has been described as “the sun shining on the rain and the rain falling on the sunshine,” provides ideal scenes of flickering shadows and dewy flowers.[1] As… Continue reading Spring Time for American Women Impressionists

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Women Artists of Paris at the Denver Museum of Art

Denver Museum of Art presents the exhibition Her Paris: Women Artists in the Age of Impressionism, on view 22 October, 2017 through 14 January, 2018. The exhibition highlights the works of women artists active in Paris in the nineteenth century—a time that was still characteristically restrictive to women. Her Paris displays works of artists who… Continue reading Women Artists of Paris at the Denver Museum of Art

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Exhibition: “Our Metropolis: Paintings of New York City by American Artists”

Truman Capote once wrote of New York City: “I love New York, even though it isn’t mine, the way something has to be, a tree or a street or a house, something, anyway, that belongs to me because I belong to it.” It is a sentiment that countless creative types have experienced over the last… Continue reading Exhibition: “Our Metropolis: Paintings of New York City by American Artists”

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Aesthetics of the Nude: Childe Hassam and George Ault

In his 1988 treatise on Pablo Picasso’s painting Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907), art historian Leo Steinberg asks us, “Are the anatomies of these women… a matter of changing taste, or of substituting the abstract expressiveness of sharp angles for anatomical curves?”[1] The subtext of Steinberg’s query is clear: is it the way the nude is… Continue reading Aesthetics of the Nude: Childe Hassam and George Ault

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The Sentimental South in American Painting of the 1920s

The 1920s, celebrated as the ‘Roaring Twenties,’ continue live in the American imagination as an iconic and indulgent era that critics self-consciously commented on prior to its conclusion. Accordingly, “even before the end of the 1920s historians had begun to write the history of the decade and to offer characterizations that have lingered ever since,”… Continue reading The Sentimental South in American Painting of the 1920s

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Brooklyn Sublime: Theodore Earl Butler featured at the Hudson River Museum

Hawthorne Fine Art is pleased to announce the inclusion of our painting Brooklyn Bridge by Theodore Earl Butler in the exhibition Industrial Sublime: Modernism and the Transformation of New York’s Rivers, 1900­–1940. This exhibition will be on view through January 17, 2014 at the Hudson River Museum in Yonkers, New York. Butler’s view above New York’s… Continue reading Brooklyn Sublime: Theodore Earl Butler featured at the Hudson River Museum

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Did you do your Summer Reading?

Hawthorne Fine Art is pleased to present the third installment of our annual Summer Reading: American Paintings and American Prose. This catalogue features highlights from the gallery’s exquisite inventory of landscape paintings paired with selections of writing by well-known American literary figures. For summer 2013, we explore works by painters who found artistic inspiration in… Continue reading Did you do your Summer Reading?