Ashcan School · Essay · Hudson RIver · Works on Paper

Room with a View: The Hopper Home in Nyack, New York

Situated along the Hudson River, the town of Nyack, New York has been a popular fishing spot since the pre-Colonial period. The Tappan American Indians named the area near the river “Nay-Ack,” which is an Algonquin term for corner or ‘point,’ and would visit the area in the summer to fish and collect oysters.[1] After selling… Continue reading Room with a View: The Hopper Home in Nyack, New York

American Women Artists · Essay · Works on Paper

Early Twentieth Century Seashores

The shorelines of the Eastern seaboard have enamored tourists for over a century. From the Outer Banks in North Carolina to the Hamptons in New York to the cliffs of Cape Cod in Massachusetts, Americans have reveled in the untouched beaches that became symbolic of the country’s natural beauty. Before the Industrial Revolution, which provided… Continue reading Early Twentieth Century Seashores

American Gilded Age · Essay · Works on Paper

A Portrait of Her Father in the Studio

Opportunities for women artists in the nineteenth century had advanced little beyond the informal apprenticeships originating in the Renaissance. While specialized art academies were founded across Europe beginning in the eighteenth century, these schools rarely admitted women. The culture was such that art made by women was considered “domestic” or “amateur” up until the early… Continue reading A Portrait of Her Father in the Studio

Works on Paper

Hawthorne Fine Art Announces “Leaves of Beauty: Works of Art on Paper (1850-1950)”

February 2018, New York, NY — Hawthorne Fine Art is pleased to announce a new exhibition of drawings entitled “Leaves of Beauty: Works of Art on Paper (1850-1950).” Works of art on paper, which first came to prominence in the early years of the fifteenth century through the rise in use of silverpoint ink, emerged… Continue reading Hawthorne Fine Art Announces “Leaves of Beauty: Works of Art on Paper (1850-1950)”

American Gilded Age · Essay · Works on Paper

‘Medium Specificity’ in Nineteenth Century Watercolors: Winslow Homer and Julian Alden Weir

In the watercolor Autumn Trees from 1878, Winslow Homer nicked the surface of his drawing to create curt, white marks seen across the swath of grass in the foreground of the scene. This enlivening technique, though present in the work of other artists including J. M. W. Turner, is unusual for Homer. It is likely the… Continue reading ‘Medium Specificity’ in Nineteenth Century Watercolors: Winslow Homer and Julian Alden Weir